Tag Archives: long-term effects

Crack Cocaine and Emphysema

Crack-Cocaine-and-Emphysema

Emphysema is a lung disease marked by the gradual destruction of tiny sacs in the lungs, called alveoli, which introduce oxygen into the bloodstream and remove the blood-borne waste gas carbon dioxide. In its main form, it belongs to a larger grouping of lung diseases, known collectively as chronic pulmonary obstructive disease, or COPD. People who smoke “crack” cocaine can significantly elevate their risks for a form of emphysema called bullous emphysema, which occurs when multiple alveoli collapse and form larger sacs, known as bullae, that don’t contribute to proper oxygen/carbon dioxide exchange within the lungs.

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Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholism, and Pneumonia

Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholism, and PneumoniaPneumonia is a general medical term used to describe inflammation that occurs in various places inside the lungs. While most people develop this inflammation as a consequence of exposure to certain viruses or bacteria, others develop lung inflammation from additional, less common sources. Alcohol abuse is a known risk factor for the onset of pneumonia. In some alcohol abusers and alcoholics, this risk comes from decreased immune function and increased susceptibility to infection. In others, it comes from structural changes that reduce the body’s ability to mechanically expel infectious microorganisms. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism also increase the chances for development of a specific form of pneumonia, called aspiration pneumonia, associated with the inhalation of foreign material into the lungs.   Continue reading