Tag Archives: dual diagnosis

Can Smartphone Monitoring Help People With Dual Diagnosis?

People who receive a dual diagnosis have simultaneous problems with a non-substance-related mental illness and some form of substance abuse or substance addiction. Doctors often have difficulty properly treating affected individuals, and the presence of dual diagnosis can seriously degrade any given person’s short- and long-term well-being. In a study published in September 2014 in the Journal of Dual Diagnosis, a team of American researchers sought to determine if remote monitoring of patients through modern smartphone technology can increase the ease and effectiveness of dual diagnosis treatment.

Continue reading

How Many Americans Have Dual Diagnosis?

Dual diagnosis is the term addiction and mental health experts reserve for the identification of overlapping cases of mental illness and substance use disorder (substance abuse/substance addiction). People affected by such overlapping problems typically encounter much greater difficulties during treatment and recovery than people who only have a non-substance-related mental illness or who only have a diagnosable problem with drugs and/or alcohol.

Continue reading

How Does Depression Impact People Seeking Substance Treatment?

How-Does-Depression-Impact-People-Seeking-Substance-TreatmentDepression is the collective name for a group of mental health conditions that cause significant mood disturbances and interfere with the ability to lead a productive daily routine or feel a sense of emotional well-being. People who drink excessively or abuse a range of recreational drugs generally have higher depression risks than the rest of the population. In a study published in August 2014 in the journal Substance Abuse, researchers from several U.S. institutions explored the ways that depression impacts the overall health and preparedness of people seeking treatment for substance problems.

Continue reading

The Challenges of Living with Co-Occurring Disorders

In his short life, Danny Watt leapt from a moving train, hurtled through the windshield of a rolling car, was beaten by drug dealers, overdosed, swallowed rat poison, and tried to hang himself. In April 2008, two college students found him facedown in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal—the medical examiner said he had drowned. He was 21 years old.

Continue reading